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RATIONAL_FOR_EVALUATING_&_SEARCHING_THE_INTERNET_UNIT Card IconRATIONAL FOR EVALUATING & SEARCHING THE INTERNET UNITTop of Page

When teacher librarians gather, they talk.  When four high school teacher librarians meet weekly it is inevitable that they discuss their patrons, particularly the concerns shared over the skills they lack.  Our students know how to text, update their Facebook page, and use Google, but when it comes to academic research their abilities are very limited.  As we all voiced the same concerns we decided that creating a class to teach freshmen proper Internet search strategies as well as how to evaluate the information they found there would be a boon to all of us, as well as fulfill the assignment criteria.

 

TEACHER_INSTRUCTIONS Card IconTEACHER INSTRUCTIONSTop of Page

The boxes below contain all the instructions and activities needed for the modules. All the student activity links are found on the Module pages.If you would like to have access to the Google Forms used please email one us and we will share the form with you.

The print format of the lessons are in PDF format. If your computer does not have Adobe Reader please download here: Adobe PDF icon
 

CONTACT_US Card IconCONTACT USTop of Page

Annette Weiskircher, TL Highlands High School

Email

http://hhs.twinriversusd.org/hhslib

916-566-3465 ext. 62939

Andrea Catania-Stephenson, TL El Camino High School

Email

http://www.sanjuan.edu/webpages/andreacatania/

916-971-7440

David Fraga, TL Mesa Verde High School

Email

http://www.sanjuan.edu/MesaVerde.cfm?subpage=15156

916-971-5281

Joanne Ligamari, TL Foothill High School

Email

http://fhs-trusd-ca.schoolloop.com/library

916-566-3445 Ext 50871

NAVIGATION_TO_STUDENT_PAGES Card IconNAVIGATION TO STUDENT PAGESTop of Page

Students: the Journey Begins Here

Module 1 Pre-assessment

Module 2 - Details of a Web Page

Module 3 - Purpose, Authority, Objectivity, Appropriateness & Relevance

Module 4- Currency, Responsibility, clarity, Accessibility, Hoaxes

Module 5- Reading and Locating Information

Module 6- Post Assessment

 
 

MODULE_1:_PRE-ASSESSMENT Card IconMODULE 1: PRE-ASSESSMENTTop of Page

Before beginning to teach the lessons, please have your students take the Pre-Assessment in the Google Form.

Grade: 10 pts. for taking the assessment.

MODULE_2:_DETAILS_OF_A_WEBPAGE Card IconMODULE 2: DETAILS OF A WEBPAGETop of Page

Just like a book has 'Features of Text' (i.e. titles, headings, index, diagram, table of contents, font color and size, etc.) a web page has specific features to help you know how to navigate through it and find information quickly in order to allow you to evaluate the site to see if the information found on the site is what you need.  

Objective: By the end of module 2,  students will understand the parts of a web site and be able to use the features of the site to evaluate the site to see if the information found on the site is what you need.    

Time: Two 60 minute periods. Lesson one- 1 day, Lesson two (sections 1, 2, 3) -1 day. Lesson three-Optional lesson

Teacher Lesson Plans:

  1. Module 2 Lesson 1
  2. Module 2 Lesson 2
    1. Section 1
    2. Section 2
    3. Section 3
  3. Module 2 Lesson 3  (Optional)

Module 2 Student Resource Pages

  1. Module 2  Lesson 1
  2. Module 2  Lesson 2
    1. Section 1
    2. Section 2
    3. Section 3
  3. Module 2 Lesson 3 (Optional)

Grade: 18 pts.  (1 pt per answer, Lesson 1- 10 pts., Lesson 2- 8pts.)


MODULE_3_AND_MODULE_4:_EVALUATING_A_WEB_SITE Card IconMODULE 3 AND MODULE 4: EVALUATING A WEB SITETop of Page

In Module 2 the student learned about the parts of a web site. In Modules 3 and 4  students will learn about the criteria used to evaluate a website. Module 3 contains 4- 15 minute lessons and Module 4 contains 4- 15 minute lessons with a 5th optional lesson on Hoaxes.

Objective: By the end of Modules 3 and 4 you will understand and be able to use the eight criteria used for evaluating a web site. The eight criterion covered are: Purpose, Authority, Objectivity, Appropriateness, Currency, Responsibility, Clarity, Accessibility. A ninth optional lesson on Hoaxes is also provided..

Time: Module 3: four - 15 minute lessons

            Module 4: four- 15 minute lessons with a 5th optional lesson

Teacher Lesson Plan: Module 3 and 4 lesson plan 

Student Resources: Module 3 and 4 Student Guide (print one for each student)

Grade: 24 pts. (3 points per lesson)

MODULE_5:_READING_AND_LOCATING_INFORMATION Card IconMODULE 5: READING AND LOCATING INFORMATIONTop of Page

Objective: By the end of Module 5, students will understand the importance of slowing down and actually reading the information on a web site, and how to read and locate information on a web page. Remember: just because it looks ‘good', doesn’t make it right. 
 
Time: Module 5 Lesson 1- 45 to 60 minutes
 

          Module 5 lesson 2- 45 to 60 minutes

Teacher Lesson Plan : Module 5 Lesson 1 and 2

Student Resources: Module 5 Lesson 1 and 2

Grade: 25pts. (10 points for each assessment form and 5 pts. for the blog) .

MODULE_6:_POST_ASSESSMENT Card IconMODULE 6: POST ASSESSMENTTop of Page

 

Have your students take the post assessment after completion of all the modules.

Grade: 10 pts. for taking the assessment.

(These are the Library Standards covered in the module lessons)    

Integrate information from several texts on the same subject in order to write or speak about the subject knowledgeably.

3.2.a  Use more than one resource, when needed, to verify and determine accuracy.

2.1.b   Analyze evidence to support research question.
2.1.c   Identify unsupported statements in resources used.

2.2.c  Analyze media for purpose, message, accuracy, bias, and intended audience

3.2.a  Analyze information from multiple sources and identify complexities, discrepancies, and different perspectives of sources.

3.3.a  Explain how meaning is conveyed in image and sound and recognize that many media messages are constructed to generate profit, influence viewers, or both.

3.3.b Analyze design elements of various kinds of media productions and identify media messages that have embedded points of view.

1.1.a    Identify topics, broaden or narrow a topic, and develop ideas to direct the focus of     an inquiry.

1.2.a   Generate research questions based on interests, observations, information, stories,  and issues, or on an assigned topic.

1.2.b   Develop and present a clear thesis statement or hypothesis.

1.2.c   Finalize the research question or hypothesis by conducting preliminary research.

2.2.e  Use systematic strategies and technology tools to organize and record information  (e.g., anecdotal scripting, footnotes, annotated bibliographies).

2.3.c  Understand that some areas of investigation have inadequate existing material and  require a change in plan, change in topic, or original research.

3.3.h  Draw clear and appropriate conclusions supported by evidence and examples.

1.3.a   Use a variety of search engines and licensed and free databases to locate  appropriate information.

1.3.d   Search for information using advanced search skills (e.g., Boolean operators,  adjacency, proximity, wild card symbols, truncation).

1.3.e   Search for information by using both controlled vocabulary (e.g., subject headings,  descriptors) and natural language.

1.3.k   Use a variety of print, media, and online resources to locate information, including  encyclopedias and other reference materials.

2.1.a   Evaluate online search results, demonstrating an understanding of how search engines determine rank or relevancy.

3.1.b   Understand the differences between quoting, summarizing, and paraphrasing and apply these skills to one’s own work.

3.1.c   Use appropriate conventions for documentation in the text, footnotes, references, and bibliographies by adhering to an acceptable format.

3.3.j   Construct and test hypotheses; collect, evaluate, and employ information from multiple primary and secondary sources; and apply it in oral and written presentations, using appropriate citations.

2.1.b   Analyze important ideas and supporting evidence in an information source, by using logic and informed judgment to accept or reject information.

1.1.a    Identify topics, broaden or narrow a topic, and develop ideas to direct the focus of an inquiry.

1.2.a   Generate research questions based on interests, observations, information, stories, and issues, or on an assigned topic.

1.2.b   Develop and present a clear thesis statement or hypothesis.

1.2.c   Finalize the research question or hypothesis by conducting preliminary research.

2.2.e  Use systematic strategies and technology tools to organize and record information (e.g., anecdotal scripting, footnotes, annotated bibliographies).

2.3.c  Understand that some areas of investigation have inadequate existing material and require a change in plan, change in topic, or original research.

1.3.a   Use a variety of search engines and licensed and free databases to locate appropriate information.

1.3.d   Search for information using advanced search skills (e.g., Boolean operators, adjacency, proximity, wild card symbols, truncation).

1.3.e   Search for information by using both controlled vocabulary (e.g., subject headings, descriptors) and natural language.

1.3.k   Use a variety of print, media, and online resources to locate information, including encyclopedias and   other reference materials.

2.1.a   Evaluate online search results, demonstrating an understanding of how search engines determine rank or relevancy.

3.1.b   Understand the differences between quoting, summarizing, and paraphrasing and apply these skills to one’s own work.

3.1.c   Use appropriate conventions for documentation in the text, footnotes, references, and bibliographies by adhering to an acceptable format.

3.3.j   Construct and test hypotheses; collect, evaluate, and employ information from multiple primary and secondary sources; and apply it in oral and written presentations, using appropriate citations.